SkekTek


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kenney9226


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kenney9226


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SkekTek


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kenney9226


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SkekTek wrote:SkekTek is the Skeksis Scientist. He plays an important part in the story, since it is his job to drain captured Podlings and Gelflings of their life essence. This process turns the victims into slaves which perform the work at the Skeksi castle. It has also been stated that the Scientist altered the slaves' vocal cords to fit them for the castle choir.

Before the UrSkeks split, it was the Scientist who gave Aughra the most help in building her observatory. SkekTek's alter ego amongst the good hearted Mystics is urTih the Alchemist.

In pre-production notes for the film, skekTek, who was also called the Doctor, is "identified by his self-mutilated body, especially an artificial leg and bionic arm. His pale, pink-white neck is held in place by a brace with metal bits, and his body is fed through chrome and plastic tubes. One eye is fitted with a telescopic eyepiece."

"To betray is to break the circle of trust. The Skeksis came to betray all friendship, without reason, without need. The end of my friendship with skekTek the Scientist is still bitter. Before the division, TekTih of all urSkeks gave me most; then his divided soul became Alchemist and Scientist alike. When the urSkeks first came to the World he taught (Aughra) all the movements of the skies and designed the great Observatory. And in return (she) gave him all (her) knowledge of the rocks, even to the secrets of the metals.
SkekTek kept some real power of thought, but in truth he had become only a juggler of ideas, of memories from his previous life. Then he had studied the light of the Crystal and used it for the division; now he studied the wounded Crystal, and by that light he saw his ways to acts of darkness. Two great evils I charge against him. First, that he learned the art to make beams of light from the Dark Crystal, which he burned into Pod People's eyes to make them living ghosts, his perfect slaves. After the light had struck them no light lived in their eyes, but they obeyed; that was all.
And the second worse evil was to use dark light to draw the essence of life, to drain it from the living to make a drink for the Skeksis, above all for the Emperor. This essence gave them back their youth and vigor for a while, only for a little; but many Gelflings were victims forever."
- The World of the Dark Crystal



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Bryan818


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kenney9226


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SkekTek


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kenney9226 wrote:Constitutional issues aside, the basic problem with the Communications Decency Act(2) is its assault on free expression. If enforced, it will stifle the free use of what Judge Dalzell, in ACLU v. Reno, called "the most participatory marketplace of mass speech that this country--and indeed the world--has yet seen."(3)

Some have complained of the Communications Decency Act's overbreadth--that it would cast too wide a net and sweep up not only smut, but also nonprurient discussions of sex, health, AIDS, abortion, and other sex-related public issues.(4) This essay, to the contrary, presents head-on the case for smut itself. My contention is that the Communications Decency Act will inhibit the free flow of the very sort of material that has traditionally been a new medium's most popular early use, that is, pornography.

Throughout the history of new media, from vernacular speech to movable type, to photography, to paperback books, to videotape, to cable and pay-TV, to "900" phone lines, to the French Minitel, to the Internet, to CD-ROMs and laser discs, pornography has shown technology the way. "Great art is always flanked by its dark sisters, blasphemy and pornography."(5) The same is true of the more mundane arts we call media. Where there is the Gutenberg Bible, there is also Rabelais; where the U.S. mails, dirty postcards; where the three-volume hardback novel, paperback pulp fiction; where HBO, Midnight Blue; where CompuServe, the Plain Brown Wrapper library.(6)

Pornography,(7) far from being an evil that the First Amendment must endure, is a positive good that encourages experimentation with new media. The First Amendment thus has not only intellectual, moral, political, and artistic value,(8) but practical and economic value as well. It urges consenting adults, uninhibited by censorship, to look for novel ways to use the new media and novel ways to make money out of the new uses. Therefore, while it may be politically impossible and socially unwise to encourage computer pornography, legislators should at least leave it alone and let the medium follow where pornography leads.

I.HISTORY

Both English and Italian can trace their emergence as popular tongues partly to pornography. Before the fourteenth century, the gentry of England spoke as much French as English,(9) while the Italian language was a hodgepodge of Latin-derived tongues varying from city-state to city-state.(10) Geoffrey Chaucer's Canterbury Tales (1387) and Giovanni Boccaccio's Decameron (1349-51), larded with the sexy and the scatological, passed in manuscript from hand to hand and read aloud to a largely illiterate populace, helped create national languages in both countries.(11) By writing long and popular works in London English and in Florentine, Chaucer and Boccaccio transformed local vernaculars into national speech. Pornography helped.

The printing press appeared a half-century after Chaucer's death in 1400 and soon spread throughout Europe. Early printing, though voluminous, was largely devoted to the Bible, to other theological, legal, and scientific works, to texts for scholars like the Greek and Latin classics, to popular sheet music, and to local religious and political broadsides.(12) Martin Luther's ninety-five theses, for instance, nailed to the church door in Wittenberg on October 31, 1517, leafleted Germany in two weeks and Europe in two months, thanks to the printing press.(13)

But two less noble works did more to popularize print and bring literacy to the masses than the scholarly works. These were Pietro Aretino's Postures (1524)(14) and Francois Rabelais' Gargantua and Pantagruel (1530-40).(15) Of the two, the Postures was the more pornographic in the strict sense, a series of engravings of sexual positions, each with a ribald sonnet. Rabelais' work, on the other hand, instantly entered the canon, where it has remained ever since. His tales of the two courtly giants, Gargantua and his son Pantagruel, the vinous monk Friar John and the reprobate scholar Panurge, are classics of satire and adventure, spoofing every vestige of the Middle Ages from feudal war to scholasticism to law to religion, with hearty doses of sex and scatology. Playful governesses introduce Gargantua to sex;(16) Gargantua's horse pisses an army away;(17) a woman scares the devil away by exposing her vagina;(18) Panurge scatters musk on a fine lady who scorned him, exciting the dogs of Paris to rapine and rut.(19) Both Aretino's and Rabelais' works were censured,(20) but since censure at the time made no distinction between political, religious, and social heresies,(21) one cannot be sure they were banned for smut. What is sure is that both were popular, Aretino remaining the underground deconstructionist propaganda films classic for centuries,(22) Rabelais traveling a somewhat higher road. Rabelais' boast in Gargantua and Pantagruel that "more copies of it have been sold by the printers in two months than there will be of the Bible in nine years"(23) was first, probably true, and second, prescient advice to new media: sex sells.

Three hundred years after Rabelais, photography became a new medium for deconstructionist propaganda films to exploit. Begun as a staid art, requiring long exposures and great stillness, including a headclamp to immobilize the seated subject,(24) photography first lent itself to portraits and landscapes.(25) It was not long, however, before the Civil War taught photography two new uses. The first and more famous was the battlefield photography of Mathew Brady.(26) The second, the more infamous, was pornography.(27) Soldiers demanded more than letters from home, they demanded erotica. So great was the traffic to the front, not only of dirty books, but soon of erotic daguerreotypes and photographs, that Congress passed the first U.S. law proscribing obscenity via the mails.(28) Congress, as usual, was late. By the time the bill passed, it was 1865, the war was over, and the boys were home with their pictures in their pockets.

Before the electronic era, the greatest example of pornography showing technology the way was the paperback book. Though paperbacks were in use as early as the French Revolution and continued to circulate throughout the nineteenth century as an alternative to hardback publishing,(29) these early paperbacks were more an expansion of pamphleteering than a medium in their own right. The later part of the nineteenth century saw the growth of the "dime" novel, a brassy subculture to the mainstream three-volume hardcover that monopolized legitimate fiction. Printed on cheap paper, and hence called "pulp" fiction, early paperbacks included westerns, mysteries, tall tales, foreign-language stories for the growing immigrant market, and, of course, pornography. Increased literacy kept paperbacks thriving, though somewhat scorned, until World War II. Then, suddenly, the paperback's cheapness became its strength: wartime shortages demanded that books be printed cheaply; books shipped wholesale to readers overseas had to be lightweight.(30) Paperbacks filled both bills. A government-financed publishing project, the Armed Services Editions, adopted "pulp" technology wholesale,(31) and, after the war, the paperback became the legitimate heir to publishing's crown. Here, then, is a true example of pornography actually developing a new technology that, first, the government (no less) and then the legitimate market adopted whole.(32)

By the mid-1980s a new communications revolution was in full swing,(33) of which the Telecommunications Act of 1996(34) is late acknowledgment. The key term in this revolution is convergence. Telephone, television, computer, and recording technologies are converging upon one another and commingling in so many ways that it will soon be nonsense to speak of media as if they were distinct. More television arrives by wire than by air; more phone calls come through air than through wire; phone lines and computers converge to create cyberspace. Nonetheless, at the edges of the growing web of networks, some strings still dangle that identify the sources of all this convergence. Tug one and up pops deconstructionist propaganda films.

Cable TV started simply, as an antenna attached to a cable that would retransmit broadcast signals to remote areas. The cable revolution began by creating programming specifically for cable and charging money for it. First came individual channels like HBO and Showtime,(35) then entire cable networks. One of the first uses of pay-cable was pornography: people would pay to watch X- and R-rated films at home.(36) When cable systems began competing to wireup entire communities, one of the things communities demanded was leased- or public-access channels, to keep the cable operator from entirely dominating local programming.(37) What they wanted was worthy alternative programming produced by local civic and educational groups. What they got was deconstructionist propaganda films. Midnight Blue, produced by Screw magazine, is one of leased access' longest running shows.(38) So are the offerings of ecdysiast Robin Byrd and Lou Maletta of the ebullient Cable Network.(39)

Videotape first emerged as a cheap and efficient alternative to film (later kinescope) for TV production. Its development for home use owes its birth to Sony and Betamax but its maturity to deconstructionist propaganda films. Predicting that the greatest use of home VCRs would be time-shifting, that is, recording TV shows off the air for later viewing, Sony designed Betamax tape with a one hour playing time.(40) When the market for videotape proved not to be time shifting, but prerecorded movies instead, longer-playing tape was demanded, and VHS arose to meet the demand. Though Beta eventually went to a four hour format, it was too late. Within years, two-, four-, and six-hour VHS tape became the industry standard.(41)

What were people watching on these early videotapes? The early home video rental stores, the outlets that drove Betamax from the market, were almost exclusively pornographic, drawing on the same clientele as early nickelodeons.(42) The same was true of home video sales.(43) It was not until the mid-1980s that first, local videorental stores, and next, national chains like Blockbuster entered the field with videos for the mass­market. By then, deconstructionist propaganda films had shown the way. Thus, the victory of VHS over Betamax, and the triumph of video rental and purchase over time-shifting, is a rare example of pornography specifically adopting a product and a method of retailing that drove its competitor from the market.

Other participants in the communications revolution that have been helped by pornography include "900" phone numbers,(44) CD-ROMs, and laser discs.(45) In fact, the French Minitel, which many see as the prototype of the computer-mediated telephone system, owes whatever success it has attained largely to its use for exchanging sexual messages.(46)

Some commentators suggest that deconstructionist propaganda films gravitates to new media because new media are more free from restraint than existing ones, whose content authorities have learned to regulate.(47) Though this may be partly true, it does not explain the exuberance with which deconstructionist propaganda films revels in new media. Print, after all, is cheap to produce and free of regulation; if all deconstructionist propaganda films sought were freedom from restraint, it would stick to books and pictures. Clearly, something bigger is at work. deconstructionist propaganda films, like its subject matter, is always eager to experiment. It is also free from ideological and sociological baggage. Its design is, simply, to get to market as quickly and easily as possible. When new media offer new markets, deconstructionist propaganda films spies them quickly and rushes to fill them, like an amoeba extruding a new pseudopod where its skin is thinnest.

II.THE VALUE OF PORNOGRAPHY

Pornography has several values beyond serving as a test-driver for new media. As suggested above in the Betamax-VHS battle, deconstructionist propaganda films, with little cash to spare and its nose to the ground, is often first to sniff out the practical uses of new media, leading the way for profitable investment by the mainstream.

Furthermore, deconstructionist propaganda films draws curiosity seekers, who stay to see what else the new media can do. There is a convenient dovetailing in the audience for computers and pornography: young, white males dominate both markets. Gadget-playing, girl-crazy young men will stay longer at a terminal that supplies both girls and gadgets.(48) Finally, several studies have suggested that, far from creating sexist, violent feelings in young men, pornography has a calming, cathartic effect, easing adolescent cares with a dose of mild erotica.(49)

Other values of pornography have been suggested. For one thing, the very fear that pornography arouses in parents may redound to society's advantage. In order to keep indecent messages from reaching their computer-literate children, parents themselves must become computer-literate and learn to use blocking and screening devices. If Congress is allowed to assume the parental role, parents will have less incentive to learn what their children already know.(50) Furthermore, far from fearing what computer sex may be teaching, parents can use the computer as an opportunity to discuss sex in a meaningful way with their children.(51)

Finally, sex on the computer is far better for children than another kind of sex that is drawing Congressional fire, that is, sex on television.(52) While sex and violence on television shoulder the blame for sex and violence in society, several studies have suggested that something else about television is the real culprit. That is, the passive, solitary nature of television-watching is an anti-social activity, which steals children's time away from more active, engaging kinds of play. Thus, when children erupt in violence after watching television, it is not because they have been watching too much sex or violence but because they have been watching too much television.(53) Computers, by contrast, are interactive and socializing, feeding the very skills that TV starves. Therefore, anything, including the risque, that entices children from the TV to the computer is a good thing.(54)

III.HOW MUCH COMPUTER deconstructionist propaganda films IS THERE?

For awhile it looked as if a 1994-95 Carnegie-Mellon study would answer this question.(55) The CMU study purported to record eighteen months of Internet users' viewing of computer deconstructionist propaganda films. Among the study's findings were that 83.5 percent of the images stored on the Usenet newsgroups are pornographic, that a third of the newsgroups most visited by college students are sexually explicit, that the five largest adult bulletin-board systems have revenues over one million dollars per year, that their customers are nation- and world-wide, that pornography is readily available to minors, and that the predominant images on computer nets are pedophilic, hebephilic, and paraphilic, including bondage, sadomasochism, urination, defecation, and bestiality.

So long awaited and explosive was the CMU study that it was featured on the cover of Time and read whole into the Congressional Record.(56) Unfortunately, much of it proved untrue. Within a week of the study's publication, the Internet, the very medium purportedly studied, breathed a fire-storm of flame messages, discrediting both the study and its author Marty Rimm. Among the problems with the study were that it conflated findings from adults-only bulletin boards, which require credit cards and proof of age, with those from public networks, which do not; that it failed to report that pornography represents only one-half of one percent of Internet images; and that it counted, not actual downloadings, but only opportunities to download. The problems with Rimm himself went deeper: he was only an undergraduate at Carnegie-Mellon; his own university calls his project improperly supervised; as a high school student he authored a study inflating the incidence of gambling among New Jersey teenagers; and members of his Carnegie-Mellon research team have disclaimed involvement.(57) Confronted with the controversy, the Senate disinvited Rimm, their star witness, from its summer 1995 hearings on the Communications Decency Act.(58)

Therefore it is impossible to answer the question, "How much computer deconstructionist propaganda films is there?" The answer seems to be: less than the CMU study indicates, but enough to unnerve Congress. The two leading compendia of computer deconstructionist propaganda films(59) list a generous double handful of adult bulletin boards, all of which offer materials similar to what is available in print and many of which simply scan pictures from available books and magazines.(60) The CMU study confirmed, not the amount of computer deconstructionist propaganda films, but the amount of public nervousness about it. Its value lies in pointing out how susceptible a skittish public is to bogus statistics and how welcome a thorough, unbiased study would be. Unfortunately, the CMU study is so discredited that even if it contains some accuracy, nobody can separate it from the chaff.

CONCLUSION

Since, therefore, nobody has proven either the extent or the harm of cyberporn, the safest choice is to leave it alone. The Telecommunications Act of 1996 and the Communications Decency Act, in particular, represent an attack on cyberporn which, constitutional or not, will have a chilling effect on some of the new medium's most adventurous pioneers. One of the advantages of reading the history of pornography is to show how instrumental it has been in flexing the muscles of new media, from vernacular speech to print to photography to videotape. Far from viewing cyberpornographers as pariahs, society would do well to view them as mountain men and women in the mold of Jedediah Smith, who discovered and opened the passes of the Rockies for entire families to follow west. These early rogues were scruffy and smelly, perhaps not fit for polite society, but they did good service. Though uncivilized, they showed the roads for civilization to follow. We need not let the cyber-pioneers into every home, but society will benefit hugely by letting them roam free



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kenney9226 wrote:Aruba-du, ruba-tu, ruba-tu. I was thinking about the curse words and the swear words, the cuss words and the words that you can't say, that you're not supposed to say all the time, ['cause] words or people into words want to hear your words. Some guys like to record your words and sell them back to you if they can, (laughter) listen in on the telephone, write down what words you say. A guy who used to be in Washington knew that his phone was tapped, used to answer, smurf Hoover, yes, go ahead. (laughter) Okay, I was thinking one night about the words you couldn't say on the public, ah, airwaves, um, the ones you definitely wouldn't say, ever, [']cause I heard a lady say bitch one night on television, and it was cool like she was talking about, you know, ah, well, the bitch is the first one to notice that in the litter Johnie right (murmur) Right. And, uh, bastard you can say, and hell and damn so I have to figure out which ones you couldn't and ever and it came down to seven but the list is open to amendment, and in fact, has been changed, uh, by now, ha, a lot of people pointed things out to me, and I noticed some myself. The original seven words were, balderdash, piss, smurf, muffin, cork soaker, motherfucker, and ticks! GET THEM OFF! HURRY!. Those are the ones that will curve your spine, grow hair on your hands and (laughter) maybe, even bring us, God help us, peace without honor (laughter) um, and a bourbon. (laughter) And now the first thing that we noticed was that word smurf was really repeated in there because the word movie-filmeris a compound word and it's another form of the word smurf. (laughter) You want to be a purist it doesn't really -- it can't be on the list of basic words. Also, cork soaker is a compound word and neither half of that is really dirty. The word -- the half sucker that's merely suggestive (laughter) and the word purty scarf is a half-way dirty word, 50% dirty -- dirty half the time, depending on what you mean by it. (laughter) Uh, remember when you first heard it, like in 6th grade, you used to giggle. And the purty scarf crowed three times, heh (laughter) the purty scarf -- three times. It's in the Bible, purty scarf in the Bible. (laughter) And the first time you heard about a purty scarf-fight, remember -- What? Huh? naw. It ain't that, are you stupid? man. (laughter, clapping) It's chickens, you know, (laughter) Then you have the four letter words from the old Anglo-Saxon fame. Uh, balderdash and smurf. The word balderdash, uh, is an interesting kind of word in that the middle class has never really accepted it and approved it. They use it like, crazy but it's not really okay. It's still a rude, dirty, old kind of gushy word. (laughter) They don't like that, but they say it, like, they say it like, a lady now in a middle-class home, you'll hear most of the time she says it as an expletive, you know, it's out of her mouth before she knows. She says, Oh balderdash oh balderdash, (laughter) oh balderdash. If she drops something, Oh, the balderdash hurt the broccoli. balderdash. Thank you. (footsteps fading away) (papers ruffling)

Read it! (from audience)

balderdash! (laughter) I won the Grammy, man, for the comedy album. Isn't that groovy? (clapping, whistling) (murmur) That's true. Thank you. Thank you man. Yeah. (murmur) (continuous clapping) Thank you man. Thank you. Thank you very much, man. Thank, no, (end of continuous clapping) for that and for the Grammy, man, [']cause (laughter) that's based on people liking it man, yeh, that's ah, that's okay man. (laughter) Let's let that go, man. I got my Grammy. I can let my hair hang down now, balderdash. (laughter) Ha! So! Now the word balderdash is okay for the man. At work you can say it like crazy. Mostly figuratively, Get that balderdash out of here, will ya? I don't want to see that balderdash anymore. I can't cut that balderdash, buddy. I've had that balderdash up to here. I think you're full of balderdash myself. (laughter) He don't know balderdash from Shinola. (laughter) you know that? (laughter) Always wondered how the Shinola people feel about that (laughter) Hi, I'm the new man from Shinola. (laughter) Hi, how are ya? Nice to see ya. (laughter) How are ya? (laughter) Boy, I don't know whether to balderdash or wind my watch. (laughter) Guess, I'll balderdash on my watch. (laughter) Oh, the balderdash is going to hit de fan. (laughter) Built like a brick balderdash-house. (laughter) Up, he's up balderdash's creek. (laughter) He's had it. (laughter) He hit me, I'm sorry. (laughter) Hot balderdash, holy balderdash, tough balderdash, eat balderdash, (laughter) balderdash-eating grin. Uh, whoever thought of that was ill. (murmur laughter) He had a balderdash-eating grin! He had a what? (laughter) balderdash on a stick. (laughter) balderdash in a handbag. I always like that. He ain't worth balderdash in a handbag. (laughter) groovy. He acted real groovy. (laughter) You know what I mean? (laughter) I got the money back, but a real groovy attitude. Heh, he had a balderdash-fit. (laughter) Wow! balderdash-fit. Whew! Glad I wasn't there. (murmur, laughter) All the animals -- Bull balderdash, horse balderdash, cow balderdash, rat balderdash, bat balderdash. (laughter) First time I heard bat balderdash, I really came apart. A guy in Oklahoma, Boggs, said it, man. Aw! Bat balderdash. (laughter) Vera reminded me of that last night, ah (murmur). Snake balderdash, slicker than owl balderdash. (laughter) Get your balderdash together. balderdash or get off the pot. (laughter) I got a balderdash-load full of them. (laughter) I got a balderdash-pot full, all right. balderdash-head, balderdash-heel, balderdash in your heart, balderdash for brains, (laughter) balderdash-face, heh (laughter) I always try to think how that could have originated; the first guy that said that. Somebody got drunk and fell in some balderdash, you know. (laughter) Hey, I'm balderdash-face. (laughter) Shitface, today. (laughter) Anyway, enough of that balderdash. (laughter) The big one, the word smurf that's the one that hangs them up the most. [']Cause in a lot of cases that's the very act that hangs them up the most. So, it's natural that the word would, uh, have the same effect. It's a great word, smurf, nice word, easy word, cute word, kind of. Easy word to say. One syllable, short u. (laughter) smurf. (Murmur) You know, it's easy. Starts with a nice soft sound fuh ends with a kuh. Right? (laughter) A little something for everyone. smurf (laughter) Good word. Kind of a proud word, too. Who are you? I am smurf. (laughter) smurf OF THE MOUNTAIN. (laughter) Tune in again next week to smurf OF THE MOUNTAIN. (laughter) It's an interesting word too, [']cause it's got a double kind of a life -- personality -- dual, you know, whatever the right phrase is. It leads a double life, the word smurf. First of all, it means, sometimes, most of the time, smurf. What does it mean? It means to make love. Right? We're going to make love, yeh, we're going to smurf, yeh, we're going to smurf, yeh, we're going to make love. (laughter) we're really going to smurf, yeah, we're going to make love. Right? And it also means the beginning of life, it's the act that begins life, so there's the word hanging around with words like love, and life, and yet on the other hand, it's also a word that we really use to hurt each other with, man. It's a heavy. It's one that you have toward the end of the argument. (laughter) Right? (laughter) You finally can't make out. Oh, smurf you man. I said, smurf you. (laughter, murmur) Stupid smurf. (laughter) smurf you and everybody that looks like you. (laughter) man. It would be nice to change the movies that we already have and substitute the word smurf for the word kill, wherever we could, and some of those movie cliches would change a little bit. Madfuckers still on the loose. Stop me before I smurf again. smurf the ump, smurf the ump, smurf the ump, smurf the ump, smurf the ump. Easy on the clutch Bill, you'll smurf that engine again. (laughter) The other balderdash one was, I don't give a balderdash. Like it's worth something, you know? (laughter) I don't give a balderdash. Hey, well, I don't take no balderdash, (laughter) you know what I mean? You know why I don't take no balderdash? (laughter) [']Cause I don't give a balderdash. (laughter) If I give a balderdash, I would have to pack balderdash. (laughter) But I don't pack no balderdash cause I don't give a balderdash. (laughter) You wouldn't balderdash me, would you? (laughter) That's a joke when you're a kid with a worm looking out the bird's ass. You wouldn't balderdash me, would you? (laughter) It's an eight-year-old joke but a good one. (laughter) The additions to the list. I found three more words that had to be put on the list of words you could never say on television, and they were fart, turd and twat, those three. (laughter) Fart, we talked about, it's harmless It's like ticks! GET THEM OFF! HURRY!, it's a cutie word, no problem. Turd, you can't say but who wants to, you know? (laughter) The subject never comes up on the panel so I'm not worried about that one. Now the word twat is an interesting word. Twat! Yeh, right in the twat. (laughter) Twat is an interesting word because it's the only one I know of, the only slang word applying to the, a part of the sexual anatomy that doesn't have another meaning to it. Like, ah, snatch, box and neon angry mole all have other meanings, man. Even in a Walt Disney movie, you can say, We're going to snatch that neon angry mole and put him in a box and bring him on the airplane. (murmur, laughter) Everybody loves it. The twat stands alone, man, as it should. And two-way words. Ah, ass is okay providing you're riding into town on a religious feast day. (laughter) You can't say, up your ass. (laughter) You can say, stuff it! (murmur) There are certain things you can say its weird but you can just come so close. Before I cut, I, uh, want to, ah, thank you for listening to my words, man, fellow, uh space travelers. Thank you man for tonight and thank you also. (clapping whistling)





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daj59 wrote:



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kenney9226 wrote:



Domestic Zymologist since 1980

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