Derby #37: Greed
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Blinded (resub)

Blinded (resub)
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squidboots


quality posts: 2 Private Messages squidboots
Re: Blinded (resub)


This depicts the Greek myth of Icarus, who was overcome with the sublime feeling of flight during his escape from Crete and flew too close to the sun despite his father's warnings, which melted the wax in his wings and caused him to fall to his death. I see greed as desiring something too much (be it material watch or simply a feeling), just as Icarus was blinded by his own greed to fly higher into the sun.

Resub: Mirrored image and added "Greek Pants" (so I can sleep at night knowing it's undoubtedly PG-13) and sandals.

Josephus


quality posts: 25 Private Messages Josephus
squidboots wrote:This depicts the Greek myth of Icarus, who was overcome with the sublime feeling of flight during his escape from Crete and flew too close to the sun despite his father's warnings, which melted the wax in his wings and caused him to fall to his death. I see greed as desiring something too much (be it material watch or simply a feeling), just as Icarus was blinded by his own greed to fly higher into the sun.

Resub: Mirrored image and added "Greek Pants" (so I can sleep at night knowing it's undoubtedly PG-13) and sandals.


Wasn't Icarus overcome by the joy of flying and just forgot to not fly too high? I really don't think the story of Daedalus and Icarus had anything to do with greed.

jzelts


quality posts: 0 Private Messages jzelts
Re: Blinded (resub)

This reminds me of my favorite poem:

Icarus fell
but oh
what a tan.

squidboots


quality posts: 2 Private Messages squidboots
Josephus wrote:Wasn't Icarus overcome by the joy of flying and just forgot to not fly too high? I really don't think the story of Daedalus and Icarus had anything to do with greed.


I think it's a matter of literary interpretation. We talked about this very issue in my undergrad classic lit course (whether it was forgetfulness or blatant disobedience) as in the literature his motivations are never really mentioned:

"They passed Samos and Delos on the left and Lebynthos on the
right, when the boy, exulting in his career, began to leave the
guidance of his companion and soar upward as if to reach heaven.
The nearness of the blazing sun softened the wax which held the
feathers together, and they came off. He fluttered with his
arms, but no feathers remained to hold the air. While his mouth
uttered cries to his father, it was submerged in the blue waters
of the sea, which thenceforth was called by his name."

I tend to interpret it as an act of selfish disobedience. I've also seen the myth used to describe situations in modern culture where people get too greedy and meet negative consequences as a result.

Aberrantic


quality posts: 0 Private Messages Aberrantic
squidboots wrote:I think it's a matter of literary interpretation. We talked about this very issue in my undergrad classic lit course (whether it was forgetfulness or blatant disobedience) as in the literature his motivations are never really mentioned:

"They passed Samos and Delos on the left and Lebynthos on the
right, when the boy, exulting in his career, began to leave the
guidance of his companion and soar upward as if to reach heaven.
The nearness of the blazing sun softened the wax which held the
feathers together, and they came off. He fluttered with his
arms, but no feathers remained to hold the air. While his mouth
uttered cries to his father, it was submerged in the blue waters
of the sea, which thenceforth was called by his name."

I tend to interpret it as an act of selfish disobedience. I've also seen the myth used to describe situations in modern culture where people get too greedy and meet negative consequences as a result.


Hmm, I too interpret it as an act of selfish disobedience, but one of Hubris, not Greed. Icarus isn't greedy to gain new heights (I think that's what you're trying to argue), he's overly prideful of the new ability to fly, and disregards his father's warnings. I've seen this myth used in modern culture situations as well, but only pertaining to situations of hubris, although it may be hubris that causes the people to be greedy.

Josephus


quality posts: 25 Private Messages Josephus
Aberrantic wrote:Hmm, I too interpret it as an act of selfish disobedience, but one of Hubris, not Greed. Icarus isn't greedy to gain new heights (I think that's what you're trying to argue), he's overly prideful of the new ability to fly, and disregards his father's warnings. I've seen this myth used in modern culture situations as well, but only pertaining to situations of hubris, although it may be hubris that causes the people to be greedy.


I just think he's a teenager, and living in the moment, not having paid attention to his father. It is a universal truth, one that we all know and have seen many times, both as teenagers and parents.

squidboots


quality posts: 2 Private Messages squidboots
Aberrantic wrote:Hmm, I too interpret it as an act of selfish disobedience, but one of Hubris, not Greed. Icarus isn't greedy to gain new heights (I think that's what you're trying to argue), he's overly prideful of the new ability to fly, and disregards his father's warnings. I've seen this myth used in modern culture situations as well, but only pertaining to situations of hubris, although it may be hubris that causes the people to be greedy.


No. I'm arguing that he is greedy with the feeling. He wants more of it, or at least to maintain it despite the danger, so he flies higher. I just wanted to submit something that depicts a situation of something other than materialistic greed...and particularly, to go against the grain of the "insert-your-favorite-animal guarding a horde of animal's-stereotypically-favorite-food" formula. ;)

AdderXYU


quality posts: 38 Private Messages AdderXYU
squidboots wrote:This depicts the Greek myth of Icarus, who was overcome with the sublime feeling of flight during his escape from Crete and flew too close to the sun despite his father's warnings, which melted the wax in his wings and caused him to fall to his death. I see greed as desiring something too much (be it material watch or simply a feeling), just as Icarus was blinded by his own greed to fly higher into the sun.

Resub: Mirrored image and added "Greek Pants" (so I can sleep at night knowing it's undoubtedly PG-13) and sandals.


While I think a good Icarus shirt would be nice and all, I can't see how Greed comes into play.

eHalcyon


quality posts: 66 Private Messages eHalcyon
AdderXYU wrote:While I think a good Icarus shirt would be nice and all, I can't see how Greed comes into play.


I think a good enough explanation has been given. Again, it's not the most common interpretation of the myth, but I think it's valid.


@squidboots - I noticed you put your entry in your signature. For that to be effective, you may want to link it back to this page so people who are intrigued can actually vote.

(Unofficial) Derby Rules (outdated?)
Designing for the Derby (definitely outdated)
Tips for New Designers (always useful)

andreus71990


quality posts: 0 Private Messages andreus71990
Re: Blinded (resub)


Way to go with that Icarus Reference. I'm not entirely sure as to how Icarus was greedy however. Perhaps a bit overconfident, but greedy is a bit of a stretch. Great shirt though.

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