Derby #200: The Silver Screen

Ready Set Action!!!

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sstrungis


quality posts: 0 Private Messages sstrungis
Re: Ready Set Action!!!


I know for a fact that this design does not use photos. It was rendered in Illustrator from start to finish. Justification, please?

S

striker138


quality posts: 1 Private Messages striker138
Re: Ready Set Action!!!


I would guess because it looks like the chair, camera, etc, each look like a photo that was traced via illustrator. I'm not saying they are, but that's the way it looks, and the rejectionator only cares about how things appear.


sstrungis


quality posts: 0 Private Messages sstrungis
striker138 wrote:I would guess because it looks like the chair, camera, etc, each look like a photo that was traced via illustrator. I'm not saying they are, but that's the way it looks, and the rejectionator only cares about how things appear.


I have got to protest some. You mean to tell me that artists here NEVER use a reference or a livetrace? Or is the trick to make it look like a live trace never happened? Artists of any stripe use refs all the time.

striker138


quality posts: 1 Private Messages striker138
sstrungis wrote:I have got to protest some. You mean to tell me that artists here NEVER use a reference or a livetrace? Or is the trick to make it look like a live trace never happened? Artists of any stripe use refs all the time.


Woot frowns upon using straight live traces. I am sure if you used a trace, and cleaned it up, and recolored it, or whatever, it would be completely passable. I see shirts all the time that look like they use traces in one form or another, but they are typically reworked to the point they don't look it.


j5


quality posts: 63 Private Messages j5
striker138 wrote:Woot frowns upon using straight live traces. I am sure if you used a trace, and cleaned it up, and recolored it, or whatever, it would be completely passable. I see shirts all the time that look like they use traces in one form or another, but they are typically reworked to the point they don't look it.


Which works as long as the artist keeps quiet about it

move along

AdderXYU


quality posts: 38 Private Messages AdderXYU
sstrungis wrote:I have got to protest some. You mean to tell me that artists here NEVER use a reference or a livetrace? Or is the trick to make it look like a live trace never happened? Artists of any stripe use refs all the time.


Reference means "I looked at it to make sure it looks right." While many artists create things straight from their mind or memory, many artists will usually use many of these. It is called a reference because you "refer" to it.

Copying an image, whether freehand or, worse, through live trace, isn't really art in any viable sense. Art involves creation. Xerox machines aren't artists. But then, neither are forgers. It's great if you can replicate the Mona Lisa. Good for you, skillboy powerhead. But you're not DaVinci. That's why museums don't regularly have high profile forgery galleries.

To put reference in a clearer contrast: I can't write a book on the civil war by picking and choosing parts of Shelby Foote's trilogy, quoting them, and linking them with conjunctions and short phrases, even if I cite every quote. I need to add my own commentary, make connections between sources, and create a new book. I "refer" to the earlier ones to enforce my individual argument. I do not simply handwrite someone else's words in a different script.

creativehack


quality posts: 29 Private Messages creativehack
striker138 wrote:Woot frowns upon using straight live traces. I am sure if you used a trace, and cleaned it up, and recolored it, or whatever, it would be completely passable. I see shirts all the time that look like they use traces in one form or another, but they are typically reworked to the point they don't look it.


I have to join this discussion; here is my oppinion
Reference means "I looked at it to make sure it looks right." While many artists create things straight from their mind or memory, many artists will usually use many of these. It is called a reference because you "refer" to it.

Copying an image, whether freehand or, worse, through live trace, isn't really art in any viable sense. Art involves creation. Xerox machines aren't artists. But then, neither are forgers. It's great if you can replicate the Mona Lisa. Good for you, skillboy powerhead. But you're not DaVinci. That's why museums don't regularly have high profile forgery galleries.

To put reference in a clearer contrast: I can't write a book on the civil war by picking and choosing parts of Shelby Foote's trilogy, quoting them, and linking them with conjunctions and short phrases, even if I cite every quote. I need to add my own commentary, make connections between sources, and create a new book. I "refer" to the earlier ones to enforce my individual argument. I do not simply handwrite someone else's words in a different script.

I hope that clears everything up

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vonhearse


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sstrungis


quality posts: 0 Private Messages sstrungis

Not quoting as it's above me aplenty...

Alright, I get that. Don't trace work and call it your own. I teach graphic design and Illustrator. I recognize that a trace is not real original art. Not everyone is as good with the Pen Tool and work from scratch. Sometimes that needed shape is beyond abilities. It is for me and I've been working with Illustrator for over 20 years.

All that being said, I encourage my students to make all work theirs even if a trace was part of that. There's a difference between a quick livetrace, and a trace that's been scaled, altered, cleaned up, simplified, recolored, and integrated into new original work. That's the trick. And here it's a large-scale trick. I find it hard to believe that every stroke of every pen tool here was born by dint of hard handwork.

All of this posted work is great stuff, but all of it isn't 100% original. My $.02.

j5


quality posts: 63 Private Messages j5
sstrungis wrote:There's a difference between a quick livetrace, and a trace that's been scaled, altered, cleaned up, simplified, recolored, and integrated into new original work.


I think the ladies call that scrap-booking :P

move along

striker138


quality posts: 1 Private Messages striker138
sstrungis wrote:Not quoting as it's above me aplenty...

Alright, I get that. Don't trace work and call it your own. I teach graphic design and Illustrator. I recognize that a trace is not real original art. Not everyone is as good with the Pen Tool and work from scratch. Sometimes that needed shape is beyond abilities. It is for me and I've been working with Illustrator for over 20 years.

All that being said, I encourage my students to make all work theirs even if a trace was part of that. There's a difference between a quick livetrace, and a trace that's been scaled, altered, cleaned up, simplified, recolored, and integrated into new original work. That's the trick. And here it's a large-scale trick. I find it hard to believe that every stroke of every pen tool here was born by dint of hard handwork.

All of this posted work is great stuff, but all of it isn't 100% original. My $.02.


I've never taken a day of any type of art class, outside the required grade school stuff which had 0% computer based design included. I wish I had, because I am light years behind the other regulars here, in terms of having the ability to take my ideas on paper and transferring them to an electronic medium.

But having said that, Live Trace should really only be used as a tool to enhance your work, and not as the source from which your work originates. Clip art, pre-rendered vector art, live traces, etc... these are things that are passable, but looked down upon in the Derby.

I understand there are plenty of places that using those tools are just a part of making designs, but here isn't one of them, for better or worse.


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