WootBot


quality posts: 15 Private Messages WootBot

Staff

Continuing from Part I, let’s look at the rest of the Principles of Art...

 

RockPaperScissor

 

Variety
Variety is the spice of good design. It’s the difference in sizes, shapes, busyness, line quality, materials, and colors that we use throughout the design to help create visual interest. The more variety we have, the more compelling the design is to look at. Rock, Paper, Scissor Hold by walmazan (above) is a great example of variety in action—literally. Everywhere you look in the design you find something new. The three characters are, appropriately, as different as can be: round, square, and angular; smooth, bumpy, and metallic; even their masks have different themes. There are varying textures and patterns throughout, including stippling on the mat, a rough texture on the rock, the repeating lines on the paper, and background characters that create a pattern all their own. Throw in stars, motion lines, and the delicate stitch work on the masks and you have a design that’s a pleasure to pore over and still handled in a way that’s instantly readable.

Also Check Out:
Still Life by Pieter Claesz...

 

SamuraiDragon

 

Proportion
Proportion is the size relationship of one element compared to another. This comes into play most commonly when we think of characters; are their proportions believable? Is a head too small? What do larger eye proportions change about how a viewer feels about a character? In the Sun Wukong design discussed in part I, Sun Wukong is a monkey but has some human proportions added to his face and body. This was an effort to give him a more regal, intelligent look befitting a king. Proportion also tells us a lot about the space we’re in. For instance the two feathers on Sun Wukong’s head appear to be of the same variety. However because one is smaller than the other, we can infer that it is further away from us.

The Samurai and the Sea Dragon by patrickspens (above) is masterful in just about every category, including proportion. The size differences between the dragon, the samurai, and the crashing waves give the image much of its power. The samurai feels dwarfed by the massive forces he opposes, making the confrontation all the more dramatic by contrast (see they all link together!). As a bonus, patrickspens has a firm grasp on human proportions, giving his samurai an air of believability.

Also check out:
Standoff by Doug Chiang

 

NobodysChild

 

Pattern/Rhythm

Repeating elements, patterns, and ideas can tie a design together by giving it a textural undercurrent. Sometimes these repetitions can be in the forefront, as in an argyle or oddball design. Other times it can simply be the subtle rhythm in which elements are placed. In the case of Nobody’s Child by radiomode (above), patterns and rhythm give the design an added vitality and charm. The artist represents the feathers and designs on the birds with playful lines, loops, and dash marks throughout. This help gives the design a spontaneous energy it might not have if every feather had been meticulously, individually drawn. It’s important to keep in mind when repeating lines, objects, and ideas that you still want some uniqueness between the individual elements. Cloning the same unchanged line or object over and over can come across as cheap and unappealing, sucking the life out of something rather than infusing it with more.

Also check out:
Jesus by Android Jones

 

TheBinge

 

Unity

Unity is how well all of the other principles come together to form a whole. This is perhaps more subjective than some of the other principles as it relies heavily on how the design “feels” or “seems”. It’s impossible to put a quantified standard on what’s required for a design to be unified, or as one. The bottom line is you know it when you see it. There aren’t areas that seem incomplete or out of place. The design is balanced and focused. It just seems “complete”. If your design doesn’t feel unified, run it through the rest of the principles until it does!

Napoleon Crossing the Alps by Jaques Louis David

Learning and revisiting these principles is a great way to assess your work and recharge it at the core. Ignore these basic principles of art and you’ll spend your time wondering why “it just isn’t working”. Master them and you will have become a master yourself. So how about it: do you dare enter the Gauntlet of Truth that is the Principles of Art?

thatrobert


quality posts: 26 Private Messages thatrobert

Good stuff! Thanks for writing this, Travis.



qwertyuiop004


quality posts: 0 Private Messages qwertyuiop004

jacques-louis?

tgentry


quality posts: 111 Private Messages tgentry

Staff

qwertyuiop004 wrote:jacques-louis?



Oops! I blame sinus medication and sleeping in high school French class.

Electrified


quality posts: 0 Private Messages Electrified

The Samurai and the Sea Dragon is it still up for sale?

goldenthorn


quality posts: 38 Private Messages goldenthorn

Volunteer Moderator

Electrified wrote:The Samurai and the Sea Dragon is it still up for sale?



No, it is no longer for sale. But if you wear a MM, WL or WXL, you can find a few on teetrade.

photophile


quality posts: 0 Private Messages photophile

I found this two part article very fascinating and great information. It was fun to see how the t-shirts are artistic, and not just fun to wear. It was really cool to see them compared to fine art. I think you did a great job of including many different types of art in your examples. Thanks for a great article.

kylemittskus


quality posts: 231 Private Messages kylemittskus
photophile wrote:I found this two part article very fascinating and great information. It was fun to see how the t-shirts are artistic, and not just fun to wear. It was really cool to see them compared to fine art. I think you did a great job of including many different types of art in your examples. Thanks for a great article.



Indeed! And for making it a point that these aren't "just shirts." I hate when people make that argument when legitimate criticisms are brought up about a design. There is no reason that "just a shirt" can't also be art; I believe that the shirt should be!

"If drinking is bitter, change yourself to wine." -Rainer Maria Rilke

"Champagne is a very kind and friendly thing on a rainy night." -Isak Dinesen

AdderXYU


quality posts: 38 Private Messages AdderXYU
kylemittskus wrote:Indeed! And for making it a point that these aren't "just shirts." I hate when people make that argument when legitimate criticisms are brought up about a design. There is no reason that "just a shirt" can't also be art; I believe that the shirt should be!



Amusingly enough, this all came in what is PROBABLY the least principled week of prints in woot history. No offense to the office squids, but any week where that is the best shirt by a mile (and the most respectable by a long shot) is a bad week for art and humanity.

PixelPants


quality posts: 68 Private Messages PixelPants

A good series of articles Travis that I can definately apply to my own work. I like that you used both art examples and design ones as they use the same principles. What I don't understand is peoples need to argue the case for t-shirt design as art. I'm not saying that you can't create artworks on or with t-shirts, just that shirt.woot and similar sites have a distinct design focus. They are functional, mass produced garments designed to communicate to an audience. I think real art exists in a different sphere.

thatrobert


quality posts: 26 Private Messages thatrobert
PixelPants wrote:A good series of articles Travis that I can definately apply to my own work. I like that you used both art examples and design ones as they use the same principles. What I don't understand is peoples need to argue the case for t-shirt design as art. I'm not saying that you can't create artworks on or with t-shirts, just that shirt.woot and similar sites have a distinct design focus. They are functional, mass produced garments designed to communicate to an audience. I think real art exists in a different sphere.



You have enough qualifiers in there that I can't quite disagree with you but I have to clarify that t-shirts are a completely unique medium and their potential to be works of art is no less than a painting or a sculpture.


tjost


quality posts: 25 Private Messages tjost
PixelPants wrote:A good series of articles Travis that I can definately apply to my own work. I like that you used both art examples and design ones as they use the same principles. What I don't understand is peoples need to argue the case for t-shirt design as art. I'm not saying that you can't create artworks on or with t-shirts, just that shirt.woot and similar sites have a distinct design focus. They are functional, mass produced garments designed to communicate to an audience. I think real art exists in a different sphere.



Be that as it may I think you do a great job of always coming to the Woot table with excellent pieces of art that happen to be made for shirts

PixelPants


quality posts: 68 Private Messages PixelPants
thatrobert wrote:t-shirts are a completely unique medium and their potential to be works of art is no less than a painting or a sculpture.


Agreed, the potential is there, but I still look at shirts that people call art and at the most consider it good design. It would be interesting to know what people think are the very best examples of the t-shirt medium.

Edit: Just added a new topic here http://shirt.woot.com/Forums/ViewPost.aspx?PostID=4394781 so people can post what they think are the best examples of t-shirt design.

PixelPants


quality posts: 68 Private Messages PixelPants
tjost wrote:Be that as it may I think you do a great job of always comming to the Woot table with excellent pieces of art that happen to be made for shirts


That's high praise coming from you tjost. While my output is uneven, it's always nice to know there is an audience here, as well as new opportunities to extend yourself each week.

thatrobert


quality posts: 26 Private Messages thatrobert
PixelPants wrote:Agreed, the potential is there, but I still look at shirts that people call art and at the most consider it good design. It would be interesting to know what people think are the very best examples of the t-shirt medium.

Edit: Just added a new topic here http://shirt.woot.com/Forums/ViewPost.aspx?PostID=4394781 so people can post what they think are the best examples of t-shirt design.



Cool. You'll want to move that topic to this forum though -- EBW is so busy with non-t-shirt stuff that it will get buried and forgotten there.


PixelPants


quality posts: 68 Private Messages PixelPants
thatrobert wrote:Cool. You'll want to move that topic to this forum though -- EBW is so busy with non-t-shirt stuff that it will get buried and forgotten there.



Just discovered that. I'd never ventured in there before but posted there because it was applicable to more than woot alone.