WootBot


quality posts: 14 Private Messages WootBot

Staff

Anyone who's spent any time around here knows we love us some books, so this week we're getting our classical lit on with a toast to the classics! Give us your best interpretations, send-ups, and re-makes of your favorite books printed before 1920! Just stay within the rules:

  • No Royal or Cranberry blanks.
  • You must title your design with the book you're referencing. Or put it in your comments or on your design detail. Basically let us know what we're looking at so we don't have to guess.
  • Your book must be published pre-1920.
  • No modern pop culture inserted (so trash that 'Link as Don Quixote' idea).
  • No text only designs.
  • No religious texts. 



j5


quality posts: 63 Private Messages j5

Quran or Bhagavad Gita!

On it!

move along

tomdesantis


quality posts: 0 Private Messages tomdesantis

What if it's a literary classic that is not necessarily a book itself but ispart of one and falls under Nursery Rhyme, fairytale or a particular story in a collection book. Humpty Dumpty for example or the 3 little pigs or something classic like that.

j5


quality posts: 63 Private Messages j5

Let's see if I can list some themes we will likely see....
Cthulhu...
yep, that should cover it.

move along

cdrewlow


quality posts: 8 Private Messages cdrewlow

I appreciate the fact that Cthulhu is too new, but no Hemingway makes me sad.

cdrewlow


quality posts: 8 Private Messages cdrewlow
j5 wrote:Let's see if I can list some themes we will likely see....
Cthulhu...
yep, that should cover it.



Dang, is it that old?

j5


quality posts: 63 Private Messages j5
cdrewlow wrote:I appreciate the fact that Cthulhu is too new...



Fine...Dagon then.

cdrewlow wrote:Dang, is it that old?

Call of Cthulhu was written in 1926, published in 1928.

move along

tjschaeffer


quality posts: 7 Private Messages tjschaeffer
cdrewlow wrote:Dang, is it that old?



1928. Methinks the year 1920 was purposely chosen by the editors...

j5


quality posts: 63 Private Messages j5
tjschaeffer wrote:1928. Methinks the year 1920 was purposely chosen by the editors...


Yeah, Most of HPL's works hit in 1920 and after. So I'm taking it that it's exclusive of 1920, leaving only the following HPL works published:
A Reminiscence of Dr. Samuel Sep 1917
Beyond the Wall of Sleep Oct 1919
Dagon Nov 1919
The White Ship Nov 1919

move along

verminbury


quality posts: 0 Private Messages verminbury

Is Edgar Rice Burroughs too pulpy to be considered "classic literature"?

tgentry


quality posts: 111 Private Messages tgentry

Staff

tjschaeffer wrote:1928. Methinks the year 1920 was purposely chosen by the editors...



Bwhahahahaha!

As far as fairy tales, we're basically looking for old school literature, which I think tales like those from Hans Christian Andersen and Brothers Grimm would fall under. But no Bible, Quran, etc... we'll save that derby for when we want to get ourselves fired.

Also be aware: normal copyright rules still apply. If we think it will get us in trouble, we may have to reject it.

thehookshot


quality posts: 1 Private Messages thehookshot

So this is kinda similar to #142: Classic Literature Mashup - minus the mandatory mashup

I know a book a lot of people will do... and I'm going to be one of them of course! Just can't resist.

curli76


quality posts: 18 Private Messages curli76

C'mon, guys. There's so many things you can do with this other than nursery rhymes:

Treasure Island
Moby Cranky Doodle Donkey
Frankenstein
Dracula
Grimm's Fairy Tales (much different than the severely-altered versions we know today)
Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass (would LOVE to see a Jabberwocky-themed shirt)
Dr.Jekkyl/Mr. Hyde
20,000 Leagues Under the Sea
Around the World in 80 Days
Journey to the Center of the Earth
War of the Worlds
Canterbury Tales. . .

SO much to work with here. Haven't fairy tales/nursery rhymes been done to death here?

tgentry


quality posts: 111 Private Messages tgentry

Staff

thehookshot wrote:So this is kinda similar to #142: Classic Literature Mashup - minus the mandatory mashup

I know a book a lot of people will do... and I'm going to be one of them of course! Just can't resist.



Yeah, the mash-up part of that derby made it kind of tough. I think this one will be a little more open.

curli76


quality posts: 18 Private Messages curli76

But keep in mind, if you try to use that book about a certain whale, Woot will change the title to "Moby Cranky Doodle Donkey."

curli76 wrote:C'mon, guys. There's so many things you can do with this other than nursery rhymes:

Treasure Island
Moby Cranky Doodle Donkey
Frankenstein
Dracula
Grimm's Fairy Tales (much different than the severely-altered versions we know today)
Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass (would LOVE to see a Jabberwocky-themed shirt)
Dr.Jekkyl/Mr. Hyde
20,000 Leagues Under the Sea
Around the World in 80 Days
Journey to the Center of the Earth
War of the Worlds
Canterbury Tales. . .

SO much to work with here. Haven't fairy tales/nursery rhymes been done to death here?



lyonscc


quality posts: 5 Private Messages lyonscc
tgentry wrote:Bwhahahahaha!

As far as fairy tales, we're basically looking for old school literature, which I think tales like those from Hans Christian Andersen and Brothers Grimm would fall under. But no Bible, Quran, etc... we'll save that derby for when we want to get ourselves fired.

Also be aware: normal copyright rules still apply. If we think it will get us in trouble, we may have to reject it.



Copyright shouldn't be much of an issue, Travis, since for Western literature, copyright ends 70 years after the author's death...
See Wikipedia

Mavyn


quality posts: 22 Private Messages Mavyn

The Jungle Book

Dante's Inferno

Candide

Most everything by Kafka

My speech is not parsing. I am speaking in ellipsis.

kevlar51


quality posts: 44 Private Messages kevlar51
lyonscc wrote:Copyright shouldn't be much of an issue, Travis, since for Western literature, copyright ends 70 years after the author's death...
See Wikipedia



Unless your Little Mermaid looks like a specific Disney character.

lyonscc


quality posts: 5 Private Messages lyonscc

I'd already been working on an entry, based on "Invictus", from William Ernest Henley's Book of Verses.

lyonscc


quality posts: 5 Private Messages lyonscc
kevlar51 wrote:Unless your Little Mermaid looks like a specific Disney character.



Ahhhhhh! Excellent point.

cdrewlow


quality posts: 8 Private Messages cdrewlow
Mavyn wrote:The Jungle Book

Dante's Inferno

Candide

Most everything by Kafka



Mmmm, Kafka. I thought about The Metamorphosis, but decided a giant bug shirt may not be the way to go...

Narfcake


quality posts: 279 Private Messages Narfcake

No shirt color restrictions... does that mean RBBG is over now? Or do we accept that the temporary substitute will continue?

Mavyn


quality posts: 22 Private Messages Mavyn
cdrewlow wrote:Mmmm, Kafka. I thought about The Metamorphosis, but decided a giant bug shirt may not be the way to go...



Well...It think it depends on the bug. Well done, it could be creepy and amazing.

I'm just hoping we don't get a slew of Alice in Wonderland (and I adore the story, really).

Could do Jane Austen...Miss Haversham lurking, perhaps?

ETA: Beowulf. Roland.

My speech is not parsing. I am speaking in ellipsis.

thejenandonly


quality posts: 0 Private Messages thejenandonly

Whatever happened to the "Random rule set by this Woot! staffer just because" rules? This Wooter misses them.

neuropsychosocial


quality posts: 171 Private Messages neuropsychosocial
tgentry wrote:But no Bible, Quran, etc... we'll save that derby for when we want to get ourselves fired.

Could someone capitalize "Bible" in the initial post listing the Derby rules? Or maybe change it to "No religious texts" since you mentioned no Bible, no Quran? Don't forget, the Book of Mormon was published in 1830!

Also, I totally laughed at "we'll save that derby for when we want to get ourselves fired." Ha!

As far as fairy tales, we're basically looking for old school literature, which I think tales like those from Hans Christian Andersen and Brothers Grimm would fall under.

Random thoughts: the Iliad, the Odyssey, the Aeneid (an opera singer with a speech bubble containing a stick figure and a bow and arrow?), Beowolf (let's not?), Jonathan Swift, Jane Austin, Mark Twain, Emerson, Thoreau, Hawthorne (would anyone want to wear a scarlet letter?), all the Brontës, most of Kafka...

Do collections of poetry count? Emily Cranky Doodle Donkeyinson, William Wordsworth, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Robert Frost's first three collections...

RIP A.A. Blanks (Obituary)

tgentry


quality posts: 111 Private Messages tgentry

Staff

Narfcake wrote:No shirt color restrictions... does that mean RBBG is over now? Or do we accept that the temporary substitute will continue?



Good call... no Royal and no cranberry. The embargo continues. I'll see about getting it added to the rules.

mathking1992


quality posts: 4 Private Messages mathking1992

I would love to see someone attempt the wealth of nations.

neuropsychosocial


quality posts: 171 Private Messages neuropsychosocial
lyonscc wrote:Copyright shouldn't be much of an issue, Travis, since for Western literature, copyright ends 70 years after the author's death...
See Wikipedia

In addition to Kevlar's accurate and vivid example, translations are eligible for copyright protection that begins with the publication of the translation. Some works originally published before 1920 may have English translations that are still under copyright protection. That probably wouldn't be much of an issue unless a prominent movie based on the translation had recently been made and a shirt could be seen as using the movie's characters, but I don't follow movies so I have no idea if anything would fit into that category!

Woot's concerns about copyright seem to include "We don't have time to deal with a C&D letter even if we're in the right; also, the legal team's hourly wages are higher than the Rejectionator's, so better safe than at a deposition for which we'd have to wear a suit instead of a woot shirt."

RIP A.A. Blanks (Obituary)

cdrewlow


quality posts: 8 Private Messages cdrewlow
neuropsychosocial wrote:Do collections of poetry count? Emily Cranky Doodle Donkeyinson, William Wordsworth, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Robert Frost's first three collections...


Or plays? Do Shakespeare and Anton Chekhov count?

tjschaeffer


quality posts: 7 Private Messages tjschaeffer

So is a Flatland reference too esoteric, or is it sufficiently nerdy to be understood by the woot audience?

brockart


quality posts: 7 Private Messages brockart
tgentry wrote:Bwhahahahaha!

As far as fairy tales, we're basically looking for old school literature, which I think tales like those from Hans Christian Andersen and Brothers Grimm would fall under. ....



Have you guys read the original Little Mermaid? There is a lot of blood in it!

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Little_Mermaid

runnerfrog13


quality posts: 10 Private Messages runnerfrog13
neuropsychosocial wrote:Hawthorne (would anyone want to wear a scarlet letter?)


Depends on how the letter was drawn, but I've often thought about making/wearing a shirt with a beautifully embellished letter A on it... I'm thinking like the old illuminated texts with scrolls, calligraphy, etc filling the middle. Probably some sort of calligraphy-shaped A (not Times, Arial, and heaven forbid not comic sans)

odysseyroc


quality posts: 32 Private Messages odysseyroc

does the title of the shirt have to be the name of the book, or can it be something like "welcome to the jungle - the jungle book" ?





brockart


quality posts: 7 Private Messages brockart

Here's my design for Jack London's, Call of the wild. Lemme know what you think.

tgentry


quality posts: 111 Private Messages tgentry

Staff

odysseyroc wrote:does the title of the shirt have to be the name of the book, or can it be something like "welcome to the jungle - the jungle book" ?



You can name it whatever you like, but as usual it's a good idea when referencing something that you include a mention of it in your title, the detail image, or in your comments so we know what we're looking at (unless it's a painfully obvious reference that is.)

darianwiccan


quality posts: 3 Private Messages darianwiccan

How about the Marquis de Sade? rofl

x 15

no1


quality posts: 7 Private Messages no1
brockart wrote:Here's my design for Jack London's, Call of the wild. Lemme know what you think.



do corded handsets even exist any more?

brockart


quality posts: 7 Private Messages brockart
no1 wrote:do corded handsets even exist any more?



I think they are used for ironic purposes only...

beware1984


quality posts: 0 Private Messages beware1984

Is Lucky Cat considered "modern pop culture"?

Also I'm kinda new so is glow ink an option?

orabbit


quality posts: 29 Private Messages orabbit
beware1984 wrote:Is Lucky Cat considered "modern pop culture"?

Also I'm kinda new so is glow ink an option?



Specialty inks are only for dailies. You should be fine with a Lucky Cat.