Derby #32: Line Art
+131

St. Pat's

St. Pat's
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replimaster


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Re: St. Pat's


Great shirt! I want one.

2005vette


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Re: St. Pat's


Who's the Wicken?

ugomona


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2005vette wrote:Who's the Wicken?


It's usually called a Trinity knot, which symbolizes the Father, Son and Holy Spirit. Others view it as the three planes of existence-mind, body, spirit. It is also known as the Lover's or Eternity knot since it shows two continuous loops intertwined as if in marriage, two unbroken circles bound in eternity. It just depends on how you want to view it, I guess.

rdcollns


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ugomona wrote:It's usually called a Trinity knot, which symbolizes the Father, Son and Holy Spirit. Others view it as the three planes of existence-mind, body, spirit. It is also known as the Lover's or Eternity knot since it shows two continuous loops intertwined as if in marriage, two unbroken circles bound in eternity. It just depends on how you want to view it, I guess.


The Celtic name for this is triqueta. Wiccans do tend to borrow a lot from the Celts since the Celts are one of the most interesting pagan cultures. The Trinity knot tends to not have the circle, but I chose this version for my wedding ring since I wanted the circle to symbolize eternal love with the circle intertwined with the Trinity to illustrate that love cannot be independant from God. I love Celtic braids though because they aren't strictly religious, and I think they have a great universal appeal.

mihalis aya


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rdcollns wrote:The Celtic name for this is triqueta. (More stuff, some personal, some vaguely historical)


As the reigning knotwork scholar...kinda. The word is triquetra and is Latinate, not 'Celtic' (Celtic is a language group, not a language, and includes everything from Breton to modern Scotts Gaelige). It comes from the Latin tri (three) and quetrus (cornered). We associate it with Celts as a whole because of its huge popularity in the Hiberno-Saxon style of art, ie, the Book of Kells and similar illuminated manuscripts. It's also found in early Germanic tribal art and I've personally seen it used in Persian henna designs, though this may be a modern cultural import.

superspryte


quality posts: 21 Private Messages superspryte
mihalis aya wrote:As the reigning knotwork scholar...kinda. The word is triquetra and is Latinate, not 'Celtic' (Celtic is a language group, not a language, and includes everything from Breton to modern Scotts Gaelige). It comes from the Latin tri (three) and quetrus (cornered). We associate it with Celts as a whole because of its huge popularity in the Hiberno-Saxon style of art, ie, the Book of Kells and similar illuminated manuscripts. It's also found in early Germanic tribal art and I've personally seen it used in Persian henna designs, though this may be a modern cultural import.

Yay language lesson! ^_^

w: 7 | t.w: 1 | h.w: 1 | s.w: 16 | w.w: 15 | so.w: 2

rdcollns


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[quote postid="2012576" user="mihalis aya"]As the reigning knotwork scholar...quote]

I stand corrected, thanks for the extra info. I'm just starting to get into some of the simpler knotwork, and admittedly don't know a whole lot yet. I just started reading what I can find online.

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