Derby #158: Physics

KEEP PLUTO A PLANET.

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Johndis5


quality posts: 3 Private Messages Johndis5
Re: KEEP PLUTO A PLANET.


When I was young I always proclaimed my distaste for Pluto. Then they kicked Pluto out of the planet club. Coincidence? You decide.

Also, no text. Sorry

LOLcommunism


quality posts: 0 Private Messages LOLcommunism
Johndis5 wrote:When I was young I always proclaimed my distaste for Pluto. Then they kicked Pluto out of the planet club. Coincidence? You decide.

Also, no text. Sorry


Distaste? Are you daft?!

No text.. BUT THIS PERSON IS A REBEL

FIGHT THE POWER MAN FIGHT THE POWER!

Would you kindly...

memphisjones


quality posts: 0 Private Messages memphisjones

LOLCOMMUNISM ::

I can tell we're going to be friends. The irony here is that I was going to suggest JOHNDIS may be a Communist, but you have assuaged my distrust of those behind the Iron Curtain as if you were the first kid to show me how to peak in at the animatronic Chuck E. Cheese band. For that I thank you.


JOHNDIS ::

Pluto never hurt anyone; it only wanted to be a part of something greater than itself. Pluto chooses Jimmy Dean Sausage for breakfast just like the rest of the solar system. You might as well steal its lunch money and knock its moons in the mud. Pluto was a planet for 76 years, and it did a great job, then science laid it off like a migrant factory worker. Science, however, does not speak for me. Pluto's fate should be decided by the people of Earth, not a group of white-coated robots sitting in an auditorium, chatting quietly about the bagel selection at the hotel's continental breakfast.

In my defense, I rasterized the type, so, technically, it is a highly organized field of color.

http://jhdep.com/

jomichar


quality posts: 0 Private Messages jomichar
Re: KEEP PLUTO A PLANET.


Did you know that Pluto is smaller than our own moon?! WHOA! I just found that out and I blame this design for encouraging me to look that up. Thank you for expanding my knowledge, Memphis.

memphisjones


quality posts: 0 Private Messages memphisjones
jomichar wrote:Did you know that Pluto is smaller than our own moon?! WHOA! I just found that out and I blame this design for encouraging me to look that up. Thank you for expanding my knowledge, Memphis.


Ha, excellent. Arm yourselves with knowledge! It's bizarre how many interesting little characteristics Pluto has.

Also, I watched an episode of "The Universe" the other day about what Earth would be like without the moon. Basically, we'd be screwed.

http://jhdep.com/

sogj


quality posts: 15 Private Messages sogj

Please make more t-shirts. You're funny.

I refuse to answer on the grounds that I don't know the answer.

Johndis5


quality posts: 3 Private Messages Johndis5
memphisjones wrote: Pluto chooses Jimmy Dean Sausage for breakfast just like the rest of the solar system.


I have it on good authority that Pluto prefers Bob Evans over Jimmy Dean, and I simply cannot support that.

memphisjones


quality posts: 0 Private Messages memphisjones
sogj wrote:Please make more t-shirts. You're funny.


Thank you. I plan on doing weekly submissions indefinitely; it's a great exercise.

And that Bob Evans was a charlatan. However, I support your lack of support...together, we could be a cheaply crafted bra...i mean, wait, what?

http://jhdep.com/

laurel861


quality posts: 0 Private Messages laurel861
Re: KEEP PLUTO A PLANET.


"Science" did not vote out Pluto. Pluto IS still a planet. Only four percent of the IAU voted on this, and most are not planetary scientists. Their decision was immediately opposed in a formal petition by hundreds of professional astronomers led by Dr. Alan Stern, Principal Investigator of NASA’s New Horizons mission to Pluto. Stern and like-minded scientists favor a broader planet definition that includes any non-self-luminous spheroidal body in orbit around a star. The spherical part is important because objects become spherical when they attain a state known as hydrostatic equilibrium, meaning they are large enough for their own gravity to pull them into a round shape. This is a characteristic of planets and not of shapeless asteroids and Kuiper Belt Objects. Pluto meets this criterion and is therefore a planet. Under this definition, our solar system has 13 planets: Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars, Ceres, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, Pluto, Haumea, Makemake, and Eris.

tgentry


quality posts: 111 Private Messages tgentry

Staff

laurel861 wrote:"Science" did not vote out Pluto. Pluto IS still a planet. Only four percent of the IAU voted on this, and most are not planetary scientists. Their decision was immediately opposed in a formal petition by hundreds of professional astronomers led by Dr. Alan Stern, Principal Investigator of NASA’s New Horizons mission to Pluto. Stern and like-minded scientists favor a broader planet definition that includes any non-self-luminous spheroidal body in orbit around a star. The spherical part is important because objects become spherical when they attain a state known as hydrostatic equilibrium, meaning they are large enough for their own gravity to pull them into a round shape. This is a characteristic of planets and not of shapeless asteroids and Kuiper Belt Objects. Pluto meets this criterion and is therefore a planet. Under this definition, our solar system has 13 planets: Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars, Ceres, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, Pluto, Haumea, Makemake, and Eris.


I like the requirement that a planet should have cleared it's orbit in order to be classified a planet. Just calling something a planet based solely on it being rounded doesn't take in the bigger picture. An object like Ceres or Pluto is a part of a larger ring of objects in the same orbit, whereas the planets are not. That's a big distinction IMO. We break everything into categories (we don't call hawks and eagles the same thing, despite the fact they share common attributes), and these smaller objects are clearly different enough from the major planets to be given their own category. I think separating Planets and Dwarf Planets was a great idea as they are different types of bodies: they orbit as part of a larger whole. Also we've found hundreds of extrasolar planets so far. In the future that will turn into thousands. It's a good idea to have well defined categories to sort these objects into (even if we'll likely not be seeing any extrasolar dwarf planets any time soon, if ever).

Oh yeah, and take that Pluto!

jadedconsumer


quality posts: 0 Private Messages jadedconsumer
memphisjones wrote:Thank you. I plan on doing weekly submissions indefinitely; it's a great exercise.


My question is: how do I buy the shirt?

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